ScarWork – because a scar is not just a mark on the skin

Posted: July 17, 2019 By: Comment: 0
ScarWork, because a scar is not just a mark on the skin.
What is ScarWork Therapy and how does it differ to basic massage?

ScarWork Therapy is an innovative technique founded by Sharon Wheeler from Seattle, USA. It is a whole body treatment that not only improves the appearance of scars and nerve function, but may also help relieve any pain in your body that you may not have even considered was related to the scar.

I believe that there are two main differences – techniques and pressure. ScarWork is a very gentle non-invasive treatment that focuses on light casual touch with long lasting or permanent results. The work starts with the surface layers and goes into the deeper, far reaches of the scar and associated tissue and adhesions. Tissue quality changes quickly and easily with lumps, gaps, ridges, knots and bumps smoothing rapidly out into your body’s natural fascial web. Scar work may result in whole body changes.

What are the benefits of ScarWork therapy?

ScarWork therapy has heaps of benefits! It is used to improve the health and feel of scars from surgery or accidents, loosening and releasing adhesions and tight tissue between the layers of fascia, muscle and connective tissue to improve mobility and reduce discomfort and pain.

Trapped nerves and irritated scar tissue can be a factor for chronic pain and discomfort. ScarWork may reduce pain and help to normalise sensitivity. For example clients with C sections often report numbness, a loss of sensitivity and that this part of their body feels alien and not part of them. Post treatment they feel the integration of this area into the rest of their body and the sensitivity has returned.

Pain elsewhere in the body that may not be associated with scars can be reduced. This is because adhesions created by scar tissue can connect structures within our body that should not be connected. Reducing these adhesions and integrating them back into the facial system improves pain and mobility restrictions. For example I worked with a lady who had a C section and then continued to have pain and sickness, after unsuccessful exploratory surgery to find out what the issue was she had a further operation this time leaving a scar from belly button to pubic bone. This operation found the original C section scar tissue had adhered to her bowel. This was resolved and she came to for scar work to reduce any future scar tissue build up and to prevent a reoccurrence.

ScarWork can assist surgeons where multiple operations are performed along the same scar line or in a similar area, as in a second C section. Treatment prior to second surgery will ensure that there is reduced or very little scar tissue for them to negotiate when they operate. This also helps with the healing process and reduces possible longer term complications.

Improvement after treatment seems to be lasting and even single sessions can be helpful.

What type of scars do I work with?

I have treated a wide range of scars including C sections, hysterectomy, surgery including spinal, abdominal, shoulder, hip, knee and breast surgery, skin grafts and burns. The most common types are C sections, breast and abdominal surgery.

Is there are timeframe for ScarWork therapy?

No treatment can be beneficial on new and old scar tissue. A scar cannot be worked on for the first 12 weeks or until it has been signed off by the surgeon. The scar needs to be healed, clean and dry. It doesn’t matter how old the scar is and I have had great results working with scars that are years old.  However, I would recommend working on scars as soon as possible to avoid scar tissue build up and possible complications.

How can I get more information or make an appointment?

For a free discovery chat to ask questions, see if I can help and find out more about how I work please complete the contact section on my website, providing you mobile number and I will give you a call to discuss.

Lisa Satchwell
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Lisa Satchwell

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